Iowa Cowboy Mounted Shooting Association

by Bill Link on March 19, 2013

Mounted ShootingCowboy Mounted Shooting is one of the fastest growing equestrian sports in the United States today and the Iowa Horse Council is pleased to welcome the Iowa Cowboy Mounted Shooting Association (IA CMSA) back to the 2013 Iowa Horse Fair to demonstrate this exciting equine sport.

Iowa Horse Fair visitors will have multiple opportunities to see mounted shooting in action when the IA CMSA presents competitions and demonstrations on Saturday, April 6 and Sunday, April 7 during the fair. And be sure to stop by the Speaker’s Area on Sunday morning to learn more about the sport and ask questions.

Consult the Official Program or the Online Calendar for time and venue details of Mounted Shooting at the 2013 Iowa Horse Fair.

About The IA CMSA

The purpose of the Iowa Cowboy Mounted Shooting Association (IA CMSA) is to instruct safe handling of firearms, to educate interested people about cowboy mounted shooting, and to promote cowboy mounted shooting by hosting cowboy mounted shooting educational hands-on clinics, hosting educational workshops for club members and to host Cowboy Mounted Shooting Association (CMSA) competitions.

The club will also be an educational resource to provide assistance to neighboring CMSA clubs with the goal of attracting new people to participate in cowboy mounted shooting; and to be a educational living history resource to other groups who want to learn more about the “Old West” – specifically the period from 1865 – 1899.

The club also strives to improve camaraderie among all CMSA members. The club will abide by the rules set forth in the CMSA Rulebook, promote good sportsmanship, and family participation in the sport of cowboy mounted shooting.

About Mounted Shooting Competition

Mounted Shooting contestants compete in this fast-action, timed event using two .45 caliber single-action revolvers, each loaded with five rounds of specially prepared blank ammunition.

Courses of fire are set in a variety of patterns.The first half  of a course of fire (5 targets) will vary with each round and can require the horse and rider to stop, turn, change leads, and accelerate rapidly.

The second half (5 targets) is called the “run down.” The run down is a straight course with targets set at approximately 36-foot intervals.

Typically, a mounted shooting competitor begins a round by crossing the timing beam at a full gallop and engages the first pattern of five targets. After a shooter fires the fifth shot, he or she returns the empty revolver to a holster, turns around a barrel, and races to far end of the arena while drawing a second revolver. At the far end of the arena, the horse and rider turn another barrel and then engage the five remaining targets of the run down at full speed.

Scoring is based on lapsed time plus penalties for missed targets or knocked over barrel. An average course of fire normally takes a contestant between 15 and 25 seconds to complete.

Leave a Comment

Previous post:

Next post: